U.S. Department of Interior-Indian Affairs Records

Lawrence Maynor, U.S. Department of Interior - Office of Indian Affairs BIA Record 1934

Lawrence Maynor BIA Record

U.S. Department of Interior - Office of Indian Affairs BIA Record, Lawrence Maynor. Lawerence Maynor and his ancestors were federally acknowledged as Federal Indians by the U.S. Department of Interior - Bureau of Indian Affairs pursuant to the June 18, 

1934 Indian Reorganization Act, Howard Wheeler Act, U.S. Federal Legislation. This law was passed and enacted by the 73rd United States Congress on June 18, 1934 as the Indian Reorganization Act (IRA), Public Law 73-383, U.S.C. United States Code 48 Stat. 984, Section 19. Codified 25 U.S.C. Indians.  The major provision of this Congress Act was to authorize official federal acknowledgement of Indians and to allow American Indians to locally govern their own Indian affairs by a Tribal Government. Tuscarora Indians are federally acknowledged pursuant to the 1934 Federal Indian Reorganization Act.

 


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Lawrence Maynor, Appellant, v. Roger Morton, Secretary, U.S. Department of the Interior 1974

Lawrence Maynor, Appellant, v. Rogers C. B. Morton, Secretary, U.S. Department of the Interior, 510 F.2d 1254 (D.C. Cir. 1975). 

Maynor filed an action for declaratory judgment under 28 U.S.C. §§ 1331 and 2201 to establish his eligibility for benefits under the Indian Reorganization Act (IRA).  In addition to the IRA, one other statute is involved, the so-called Lumbee Act of 7 June 1956. Lawrence Maynor was one of the Tuscarora Indians who was federally acknowledged by the U.S. Department of Interior- Office of Indian Affairs in and around Robeson County, North Carolina. In 1934, the Indian Reorganization Act (IRA) was passed by the United State Congress. The pertinent provision of this comprehensive Act is the clause defining the term in Section 19 "Indian:" All persons of Indian descent who are members of any recognized Indian tribe now under Federal jurisdiction, and all persons who are descendants of such members who were, on June 1, 1934, residing within the present boundaries of any Indian reservation, and shall further include all other persons of one-half or more Indian blood. Maynor and other Tuscarora Indians was certified as being Indian by the Office of Indian Affairs in 1938.  to the Commissioner of Indian Affairs from then Assistant Solicitor Felix S. Cohen, who later authored the Treatise Federal Indian Law (1943). 


https://law.justia.com/cases/federal/appellate-courts/F2/510/1254/194646/

1934 Indian Reorganization Act, 48 Stat. 498, Sec.19, U.S.C. 25 Indians

The Tuscarora Indians were federally acknowledge pursuant to the 1934 Indian Reorganization Act (IRA), 48 Stat 984, Sec. 19, also called Wheeler–Howard Act, (June 18, 1934), measure enacted by the U.S. Congress, was federally directed and signed by the U.S. President Franklin Roosevelt  at increasing Sovereignty and Indigenous Rights with federal services to American Indians, Tribes, and Indian Affairs Programs concerning increasing Indian self-government and to have trust responsibility.  The Indian Reorganization Act remains the basis of federal legislation concerning Indian affairs.  Section 19 of the IRA reads as follows: The term "Indian" as used in this Act shall include all persons of Indian descent who are members of any recognized Indian tribe now under Federal jurisdiction, and all person who are descendants of such members who were, on June 1, 1934, residing within the present boundaries of any reservation, and shall further include all other persons of one-half or more Indian blood. For the purposes of this Act, Eskimos and other aboriginal peoples of Alaska shall be considered Indians. The term "tribe" wherever used in this Act shall be construed to refer to any Indian tribe, organized band, pueblo, or the Indians residing on one reservation. The words "adult Indians" wherever used in this Act shall be construed to refer to Indians who have attained the age of 21 years. 


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The White House Letter 1976 U.S. President's Office

On August 27, 1976, the President's Office in the White House, Washington, DC, sent this letter to Mr. Reid Chambers, the Associate Solicitor General for the U.S. Office of Indian Affairs during the two U.S. Presidents Nixon and Ford Administration. This letter confirmed that the U.S. Presidential Office evidently identified several bands of Tuscaroras in North Carolina. 


https://cloud.acrobat.com/file/a01d764a-f67b-4480-9442-c2ca465ae6ff



The U.S. Bureau of Indian Affairs Tribal Houses 1976

On October 29, 1976, the United States Department of Interior, Bureau of Indian Affairs Director, Harry Rainbolt sent the BIA Letter for payment to build Tribal Houses for Indians to be built for Tuscarora Indians in Robeson County, North Carolina, at which these BIA Tribal houses are still under the federal jurisdiction of the U.S. Department of Interior and lands under abstract title trust.


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